Duane Michals

Zip Zap Zip, 2018

Film still

Duane Michals

Interruptus, 2018

Film still

Chie Fueki
Where, 2017
Acrylic, ink and colored pencil on mulberry paper on wood
72 x 72 in.

Chie Fueki
Ellen, 2017
Acrylic, ink and colored pencil on mulberry paper on wood
60 x 72 in.

Alexi Worth

Ballot Box, 2018

Mixed media on open linen

28 x 21 in.

 

Alexi Worth

Ballot Box, 2018

Mixed media on open linen

28 x 21 in.

 

Didier William
Rete anda kabann Ian avè m, 2018
Collage and woodstain on panel
60 x 48 in.

Didier William
Pye m pa pou mwen, 2018
Collage and woodstain on panel
24 x 18 in.

Bridget Mullen
Abstraction Is Inevitable, 2018
Flashe and spray paint on linen
70 x 68 in.
 

Bridget Mullen
Reel Registers Register Real, 2018
Acrylic, Flashe and spray paint on linen
68 x 58 in.

Bridget Mullen
What Paintings Want, 2018
Acrylic and Flashe on canvas
32 x 16 in.
 

Doron Langberg
Zach and Nir, 2018
Oil on linen
96 x 80 inches
 

Joyce Kozloff
JEEZ, 2012
Acrylic on panel
144 x 144 in.

Press Release

DC Moore Gallery is pleased to present ZIG ZAG ZIG a group exhibition which will include the debut of three new films by photographer Duane Michals, as well as paintings by Chie Fueki, Joyce Kozloff, Doron Langberg, Bridget Mullen, Didier William, and Alexi Worth.  

Michals’ “mini-movies,” Interruptus, Zip Zap Zip, and Thrill incorporate a technique which he calls “Zig Zag Color.” Affirming formal play and complexity, artifice and earnest emotion, the rangy spirit of Michals’ new work also provides a temperamental touchstone for the five painters, who otherwise represent a spectrum of approaches, generations and national origins.

Intricate and eye-dazzling, Chie Fueki’s paintings picture contemporary life in spectacular motion. We are drivers or bicyclists, maneuvering within confetti-like blizzards of memory and information. In Didier Williams’ images, on the other hand, the body itself becomes a kind of blizzard, a swarm of eye-shapes gouged by the hundreds from the surface of wood panels, communicating anxiety and fragility. Bridget Mullen’s images are still more crowded and fractious, composed of bulbous cartoony spray-painted shapes, like a rogue’s gallery of graphic impulses, at once beguiling and absurd.

In a more naturalistic mode that is closer to Michal’s own erotic preoccupations, Doron Langberg represents the pleasures of daily life, affirming and elevating queer domesticity and vulnerability through portraiture, and his own tender, virtuosic painterly touch. Worth’s Ballot Box paintings, on the other hand, offer a more abstract and whimsical naturalism. Each painting depicts a translucent box, partially filled with folded paper shapes that might be ballots, raffle tickets, or multicolored currency. The content of the paintings, like so much else, depends on these unsolicited contributions.

Last but hardly least, Kozloff’s JEEZ is an enormous altarpiece of brightly-colored Christomania. Hundreds of images of Jesus, adapted from Old Master paintings and roadside kitsch, zigzag across a pseudo-antique map of the globe, creating a massive affirmation of color, complexity, and (good-natured) irreverence. 

Project Gallery

Concurrently on display in the Project Gallery, in conjunction with ZIG ZAG ZIG, is Line Up, a bumptious exhibition of drawings and works on paper, both old and new, spanning a hundred years. The artists included are Milton Avery, Romare Bearden, Charles Burchfield, Isabel Bishop, Paul Cadmus, David Driskell, Edward Hopper, Mark Innerst, Valerie Jaudon, Robert Kushner, Franz Kline, Jacob Lawrence, Whitfield Lovell, Nathan Oliveira, Katia Santibañez, Ben Shahn, Claire Sherman, Michael Stamm, Barbara Takenaga, George Tooker, and Darren Waterston.

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